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Unread 12-11-2020, 08:27 PM
otbarney
 
Default Albert Quixall

Another one bites the dust. 😔
 
Unread 12-11-2020, 08:30 PM
andyroo
 
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Signed for us after Munich. So must've had a fair old innings.

RIP
 
Unread 12-11-2020, 08:30 PM
naes_sean
 
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Transfer record at the time.
 
Unread 12-11-2020, 11:11 PM
red in cumbria
 
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RIP to another stalwart of the Busby era.
 
Unread 13-11-2020, 09:01 AM
windy waffles
 
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Always remember his name on the blue and white striped third kit we had.
 
Unread 20-11-2020, 05:05 PM
jem
 
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obit in the times today.


quixall is given some ballet tuition from his future wife, jeanette, to improve his skills

quote some snips purely for the purpose of saying what a wonderfully written obit it is and so much better than the one for the monster schmeckle agent a couple of days ago. and with a nice ballet photo. can only imagine what they will do for giggsy.

Quote:
In the late 1950s Albert Quixall was the hottest property in British football in more ways than one. The inside forward was renowned for his wizardry with the ball and trademark body swerve, but he also had a legion of female fans swooning over his blond Teddy boy quiff, boyish good looks and tight-fitting shorts, which, he insisted, gave him more freedom of movement. Nicknamed Golden Boy, he was the David Beckham of his day.

Matt Busby broke the British transfer record to sign him for Manchester United for £45,000 in September 1958. He saw Quixall as a vital creative element in the team he was rebuilding after the Munich air crash on February 6, which devastated the brilliant young side known as the “Busby Babes”.

Of the eight players who perished, Duncan Edwards, Roger Byrne, Tommy Taylor, David Pegg and Mark Jones had been personal friends of Quixall from schoolboy football, National Service and playing for England.

Less than a fortnight after the crash, which had killed 23 people, Quixall had lined up for Sheffield Wednesday in an FA Cup tie against a patched-up United side led by the Munich survivor Bill Foulkes at Old Trafford. For Quixall, who had attended the funeral of Pegg, his fellow Yorkshireman, it was a night he would never forget. “We were playing more than 11 players,” he said after United had won 3-0. “We were playing 60,000 fans as well.”

Quixall later said that he would not have left his beloved Sheffield Wednesday for any other team, but felt an irresistible emotional pull to be part of United’s resurrection after Munich. The young player had no idea that he was the most expensive player in history until he was besieged by reporters and photographers while playing a round of golf and was asked to be interviewed by Cliff Michelmore on the BBC’s Tonight programme.

However, he began to justify the fee as he helped United to finish a remarkable second place in the 1958-59 season, behind the champions, Wolves. Bobby Charlton, a survivor of the Munich crash, attributed the fact that he was suddenly scoring more goals to Quixall’s presence. He wrote in his autobiography: “When I broke through an offside trap, often it was to get on to the end of one of Albert’s perfectly placed passes.”

Short and light of physique, the superbly balanced Quixall also had a powerful shot of his own, which he once demonstrated in a pre-season friendly against Bayern Munich by scoring from the halfway line.

Ultimately though, Quixall never quite lived up to his early promise and was criticised for a tendency to fade from games. For the next four seasons United were unable to muster a challenge for the first division title. Because of the Golden Boy tag, the quiet Quixall had an undeserved reputation for big-headedness. Opposing defenders did not appreciate being made to look like fools by Quixall’s range of “tricks and flicks”. He often ended up in trouble with referees for retaliating to heavy challenges. “If having confidence in my ability is big-headedness, I plead guilty to the charge,” he once said. “If I am perceived to be c**ky on the field, it is my everlasting habit of wanting to improve my game.”

He managed to stay at United long enough to win the FA Cup in 1963 when they beat Leicester City 3-1.

Busby was now intent on rebuilding the side again, with the forward line redesigned around Denis Law, the newly acquired Scottish striker. Quixall was allowed to leave United at the end of the 1963-64 season, just as the club were about to embark on a glorious period of success. By then a new golden boy was emerging in United’s forward line. His name was George Best.

Albert Quixall was born in 1933 into a working-class family who lived five minutes’ walk from Sheffield Wednesday’s Hillsborough ground.... [some stuff about sheff wed that no one cares about].....

After 65 goals in 260 league appearances for Sheffield Wednesday, Quixall signed for Manchester United on wages of £20 a week and a signing-on fee of £300. He scored 56 goals in 184 appearances for United before moving to Oldham Athletic for £7,000. He retired because of injury in 1968 after playing a handful of games for Stockport County.

Quixall later became a scrap metal dealer in the Manchester area, leading to the inevitable newspaper headlines about a career that had ended “on the scrapheap”.

He had married Jeanette in 1956. She survives him along with their sons, Paul and David, who worked for the family business, and their daughter, Jane. His later years were blighted by ill health and misfortune. A bracelet he had made for his wife featuring his FA Cup and second division winners medals was stolen in 1987 and he was unable to claim on the insurance. He sold his England caps for a relatively modest sum and struggled financially as a result of a bad investment. Had he lived in the modern era, the commercial spin-offs from his Beckhamesque skills and good looks would have brought him riches.

In retirement, he lived five minutes from the Old Trafford ground, but his wife said that he was too proud to accept offers of complimentary tickets to games.

In any case, he had fallen out of love with football and found modern coaching methods perplexing. He once said: “Matt Busby used to say ‘go out and enjoy yourself’ and that was the end of the story.”

Albert Quixall, footballer, was born on August 9, 1933. He died of undisclosed causes on November 12, 2020, aged 87
 
Unread 20-11-2020, 05:25 PM
rubbernecker
 
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[some stuff about sheff wed that no one cares about].....

Your editing I presume ...if so

Good read ta
 
Unread 20-11-2020, 05:30 PM
jem
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubbernecker View Post
[some stuff about sheff wed that no one cares about].....

Your editing I presume ...if so

Good read ta
yes. didn't want to just cut and paste the whole thing. nor do I actually think it is a particularly well-written obit, as it goes. but I felt the times would prefer that commentary if they were thinking of shutting down the site. however, I am happy to say that their obits are usually a good read - although it helps if the stiff is a bit of a character. um... was a bit of a character. whevs.
 
Unread 20-11-2020, 05:31 PM
Bunker Buster
 
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We're editing people's obits now

2020, what a year...
 
Unread 20-11-2020, 05:32 PM
jem
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster View Post
We're editing people's obits now

2020, what a year...
*sigh*

for anyone who wants to read the whole thing:

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/r...uary-k35k9w083

oh... and has an account, obvs.
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