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Unread 05-07-2022, 08:40 AM
Drexl
 
Default Richard Feynman

You boy! Stop chewing at the back.

Your homework this week is to read and memorize the following lectures.

There will be a test. Dismissed.

https://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/I_toc.html
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:08 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

He's not exactly selling it here is he

Quote:
If you are going to be a physicist, you will have a lot to study: two hundred years of the most rapidly developing field of knowledge that there is. So much knowledge, in fact, that you might think that you cannot learn all of it in four years, and truly you cannot; you will have to go to graduate school too!

Surprisingly enough, in spite of the tremendous amount of work that has been done for all this time it is possible to condense the enormous mass of results to a large extent—that is, to find laws which summarize all our knowledge. Even so, the laws are so hard to grasp that it is unfair to you to start exploring this tremendous subject without some kind of map or outline of the relationship of one part of the subject of science to another.
I really wish I could find the time to read them all, and I really really wish I would be able to understand half of what they say
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:18 AM
Drexl
 
Default

Me too!

I've read Brief History of Time, and I sort of "understood" the first half (or rather, Hawking made it accessible). But once he went to the level of the atom my brain just melted and dribbled out my ears.

Worse still, reading isn't physics: physics is maths, and maths isn't even mentioned

Oh to be smart
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:23 AM
Bunker Buster
 
Default

Pretty clued up in about 35/52 chapters ...

I mean, this is very basic thermodynamics

Quote:
. Suppose we build a heat engine that has a “boiler” somewhere at a temperature T1. A certain heat Q1 is taken from the boiler, the steam engine does some work W, and it then delivers some heat Q2 into a “condenser” at another temperature T2 (Fig. 44–3). Carnot did not say how much heat, because he did not know the first law, and he did not use the law that Q2 was equal to Q1 because he did not believe it. Although everybody thought that, according to the caloric theory, the heats Q1 and Q2 would have to be the same, Carnot did not say they were the same—that is part of the cleverness of his argument. If we do use the first law, we find that the heat delivered, Q2, is the heat Q1 that was put in minus the work W that was done:
Q2=Q1−W.(44.3
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:25 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drexl
Me too!

I've read Brief History of Time, and I sort of "understood" the first half (or rather, Hawking made it accessible). But once he went to the level of the atom my brain just melted and dribbled out my ears.

Worse still, reading isn't physics: physics is maths, and maths isn't even mentioned

Oh to be smart
I read that but years ago, I must revisit it.

I've read a number of Brian Cox's books on the subject of quantum mechanics and it sort of makes sense at the time but I'd struggle to explain it to anyone else.

Physics is very much maths, but unless you are actually going to do the experiments and calculations yourself, you don't really need to understand the maths, just the basic concepts of what it's being used for.
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:26 AM
Drexl
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by red red robbo
I read that but years ago, I must revisit it.

I've read a number of Brian Cox's books on the subject of quantum mechanics and it sort of makes sense at the time but I'd struggle to explain it to anyone else.

Physics is very much maths, but unless you are actually going to do the experiments and calculations yourself, you don't really need to understand the maths, just the basic concepts of what it's being used for.
I hear you on that. I understood once (for about twenty minutes) why the universe isn't expanding into "something else", but Lord knows I cannot now explain it even to myself
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:29 AM
Bunker Buster
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by red red robbo

Physics is very much maths, but unless you are actually going to do the experiments and calculations yourself, you don't really need to understand the maths, just the basic concepts of what it's being used for.
What experiments ?

Depending on what you're working on you do need to understand the maths, 100%

The basic laws of physics are fundamental to the operation...

Pressure, flow, temperature, efficiency, load, power, output, input etc etc....

All require a knowledge of formula from drawings upwards to daily use....
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:48 AM
Finport Red
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
What experiments ?

Depending on what you're working on you do need to understand the maths, 100%

The basic laws of physics are fundamental to the operation...

Pressure, flow, temperature, efficiency, load, power, output, input etc etc....

All require a knowledge of formula from drawings upwards to daily use....
Innit
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:48 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
What experiments ?

Depending on what you're working on you do need to understand the maths, 100%

The basic laws of physics are fundamental to the operation...

Pressure, flow, temperature, efficiency, load, power, output, input etc etc....

All require a knowledge of formula from drawings upwards to daily use....
Any experiments, physics is kinda full of them.

If you're working with it yeah of course you do, from an interest point of view you don't need to understand the maths, just trust that it works.

That's all thermodynamics anyway, I'm more interested in particle physics.
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:51 AM
Bunker Buster
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by red red robbo
Any experiments, physics is kinda full of them.

If you're working with it yeah of course you do, from an interest point of view you don't need to understand the maths, just trust that it works.

That's all thermodynamics anyway, I'm more interested in particle physics.
Physics in real time is not full of experiments mate, sorry, you're incorrect ..

I'm going off the original link....

It touches on space etc, but it's very entry level stuff on the whole....

Think drex could nail most of it....
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 09:52 AM
Baron
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by red red robbo
I read that but years ago, I must revisit it.

I've read a number of Brian Cox's books on the subject of quantum mechanics and it sort of makes sense at the time but I'd struggle to explain it to anyone else.

Physics is very much maths, but unless you are actually going to do the experiments and calculations yourself, you don't really need to understand the maths, just the basic concepts of what it's being used for.
I'm spending the evening of my 43rd birthday this year at a Brian Cox lecture at the Opera House

Fascinated by all of this, understand literally none of it. I need Coxy to do a PowerPoint of things with basic shapes & talk really slowly.
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:01 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
Physics in real time is not full of experiments mate, sorry, you're incorrect ..

I'm going off the original link....

It touches on space etc, but it's very entry level stuff on the whole....

Think drex could nail most of it....
I literally did an experiment involving specific heat capacity for my A level physics. Just about everything we know about physics can be proved by experiment, it's sort of the point.

Yeah, there's only a few lectures on particle physics, relativity and space time, it is mostly real-world stuff, and by the I mean things you can see and feel around you, not the concept of something being in two places at the same time or time moving slower when you are on a train (although you can experience this on Southern trains).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron
I'm spending the evening of my 43rd birthday this year at a Brian Cox lecture at the Opera House

Fascinated by all of this, understand literally none of it. I need Coxy to do a PowerPoint of things with basic shapes & talk really slowly.
He is pretty good at explaining things at that level in his books. I saw him at some software show doing a half hour discussion about basic physics, he's very entertaining, it will be a good evening.

The advantage of the books is you can go back and read something again, and again, until it makes sense
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:07 AM
Bunker Buster
 
Default

A level physics and you did EXPERIMENTS !!!

You've completely missed my point as per usual, but whatever....

Good luck Drex, start slowly, a chapter a night, you can always use your own desire for knowledge to expand on this guy's work and do some research of your own....once you've nailed a chapter move on, it's in a pretty weird order, but it's not as hard as you think...

Maths / physics are beautiful when it all comes out at the end....
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:09 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
A level physics and you did EXPERIMENTS !!!

You've completely missed my point as per usual, but whatever....

Good luck Drex, start slowly, a chapter a night, you can always use your own desire for knowledge to expand on this guy's work and do some research of your own....once you've nailed a chapter move on, it's in a pretty weird order, but it's not as hard as you think...

Maths / physics are beautiful when it all comes out at the end....
Try making it in a more understandable way then.
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:13 AM
Bunker Buster
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by red red robbo
Try making it in a more understandable way then.
Quote:
Physics is full of experiments and you don't need to understand the maths...
Factually incorrect at any level above base...

Ok ?
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:29 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
Factually incorrect at any level above base...

Ok ?
Ah, your usual trick of misrepresenting what someone says in order to make a snidy put down. Gotcha.

Actual quote...
Quote:
Any experiments, physics is kinda full of them.

If you're working with it yeah of course you do, from an interest point of view you don't need to understand the maths, just trust that it works.
And physics is full of experiments, it's self evident, I don't really see how you could argue against that
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:32 AM
Bunker Buster
 
Default

There's no snide FFS

Maybe because I have qualifications in the field and do it as a full time job ?
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 10:52 AM
Zorg
 
Default

 
Unread 05-07-2022, 11:22 AM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
There's no snide FFS

Maybe because I have qualifications in the field and do it as a full time job ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
What experiments ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunker Buster
A level physics and you did EXPERIMENTS !!!
 
Unread 05-07-2022, 11:47 AM
Drexl
 
Default

"Whenever one object exerts a force on another object, the second object exerts an equal and opposite on the first."

Gotcha
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