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Unread 13-09-2022, 05:46 PM
elhombre
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by My Name is Heath View Post
Has anyone done this?

Potential mid-life crisis but...it does appeal to me.

Giving back to the community, longer holidays with daughter etc.

I'm not sure working in the rat race at 65 is appealing.

I suppose it's like going from playing to coaching.

I'd do maths I reckon and not sure if maths teachers are still in demand.

anyone?
you'd be paid a wedge just to train to be a teacher - 25k just for a year to train to be a teacher. tax free lump sum. maths is in huge demand. as is physics.

did a PhD, MSc and BSc - cushy job in the NHS - medicine and clinical science.

every day seemed to drag and every day seemed the same.

felt like I'd done my stretch in that respect and done what I could.

I went in to teaching at 34(??)

I've had probably the most diverse teaching career possible - no fun knows where I taught and the role I had. basically a teacher who had the tough kids in a very tough area of Salford. that was my niche, my skill-set. teaching the hard to reach kids. I was Dr Teacher, but with a thick as f*** Salford accent.

I then went on to teach and still do teach in a very affluent area in a grammar school.

I also trained in a school with 55% traveller kids in Yorkshire.

my take on teaching

Cons:
* You've got to be mentally resilient - every day is just an unknown.
* with respect to the above, I've dealt with kids who have been stabbed, shot, their parents murdered. kids who have had psychotic episodes. I've dealt with kids under witness protection etc. i've had conversations with parents who are dying and parents who have lost kids. you see it all and you have to deal with it.
* I've worked in schools where kids don't have enough money for the electricity, they've got nits, they are stealing food from school.
* you've got to be able to deal with all this sort of stuff, whilst teaching pretty tricky stuff, like maths or physics but at the same time make the class fun. I can't count the number of times I've been hammered for my clothes, my accent, my anecdotes, my stories. every lesson I get shit for being smaller than some kids in year 9.
* With reference to the above, I've also lost count the times the kids have said "thanks sir, I've had a laugh - and we don't mean what we say.."
* you will work every night, marking, planning, going on sports trips in the pissing rain. you don't get a lunch time or a break as there's always something to do.
* the money is crap for the job you do and the hours you give up.
* you've always got someone telling you've got to do something extra and you never feel like you're winning


Pros:
* you may be the only decent adult or person that kid will meet that week - at the very least you'll be an adult who shows them a lot of constructive attention and who will be a significant part of their life.
* even by sometimes bollocking a kid (I rarely shout), you are doing them a favour by teaching them wrong from right and showing you care
* sometimes you may be the teacher who gets them the a-levels to get them to Oxford or Cambridge - that's happened to me this year.
* if you're having a shit day - and I've had a few of them, kids aren't your mates, but they'll never let you sit there and wallow. they'll always make sure you're alright even if they don't show it overtly.
* you change lives - I've taught some of the toughest kids you can imagine and even now, 10 years on in pubs in Salford and manchester, when they're with their crew they'll take time to come over and speak to you, because they know all you ever wanted was the best for them. if you show kids you care, they will never see you wrong. I remember this year, for my 41st, I kept telling the lads I taught that I really wanted a PS5, but couldn't find one as everywhere had sold out. they were leaving school soon (off to uni). the day before my birthday they gate crashed my lesson and presented me with a brand new PS5. (I hope it wasn't nicked). it was a surreal and humbling experience and the best good bye present ever.

It's a tough job. you don't get any thanks. but the holidays are amazing....
you get it in the neck off everyone (and we're lazy). and we are teachers because we can't do anything else.

and I'm always driving the least flashy car when I meet up with my mates who are directors and senior managers in industry. I won't be retiring at 55.

But would I swap it for any other job or any amount of money? (within reason)

not a chance.

I've loved every single f***ing minute.

🙂
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 05:53 PM
no fun
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elhombre View Post
you'd be paid a wedge just to train to be a teacher - 25k just for a year to train to be a teacher. tax free lump sum. maths is in huge demand. as is physics.

did a PhD, MSc and BSc - cushy job in the NHS - medicine and clinical science.

every day seemed to drag and every day seemed the same.

felt like I'd done my stretch in that respect and done what I could.

I went in to teaching at 34(??)

I've had probably the most diverse teaching career possible - no fun knows where I taught and the role I had. basically a teacher who had the tough kids in a very tough area of Salford. that was my niche, my skill-set. teaching the hard to reach kids. I was Dr Teacher, but with a thick as f*** Salford accent.

I then went on to teach and still do teach in a very affluent area in a grammar school.

I also trained in a school with 55% traveller kids in Yorkshire.

my take on teaching

Cons:
* You've got to be mentally resilient - every day is just an unknown.
* with respect to the above, I've dealt with kids who have been stabbed, shot, their parents murdered. kids who have had psychotic episodes. I've dealt with kids under witness protection etc. i've had conversations with parents who are dying and parents who have lost kids. you see it all and you have to deal with it.
* I've worked in schools where kids don't have enough money for the electricity, they've got nits, they are stealing food from school.
* you've got to be able to deal with all this sort of stuff, whilst teaching pretty tricky stuff, like maths or physics but at the same time make the class fun. I can't count the number of times I've been hammered for my clothes, my accent, my anecdotes, my stories. every lesson I get shit for being smaller than some kids in year 9.
* With reference to the above, I've also lost count the times the kids have said "thanks sir, I've had a laugh - and we don't mean what we say.."
* you will work every night, marking, planning, going on sports trips in the pissing rain. you don't get a lunch time or a break as there's always something to do.
* the money is crap for the job you do and the hours you give up.
* you've always got someone telling you've got to do something extra and you never feel like you're winning


Pros:
* you may be the only decent adult or person that kid will meet that week - at the very least you'll be an adult who shows them a lot of constructive attention and who will be a significant part of their life.
* even by sometimes bollocking a kid (I rarely shout), you are doing them a favour by teaching them wrong from right and showing you care
* sometimes you may be the teacher who gets them the a-levels to get them to Oxford or Cambridge - that's happened to me this year.
* if you're having a shit day - and I've had a few of them, kids aren't your mates, but they'll never let you sit there and wallow. they'll always make sure you're alright even if they don't show it overtly.
* you change lives - I've taught some of the toughest kids you can imagine and even now, 10 years on in pubs in Salford and manchester, when they're with their crew they'll take time to come over and speak to you, because they know all you ever wanted was the best for them. if you show kids you care, they will never see you wrong. I remember this year, for my 41st, I kept telling the lads I taught that I really wanted a PS5, but couldn't find one as everywhere had sold out. they were leaving school soon (off to uni). the day before my birthday they gate crashed my lesson and presented me with a brand new PS5. (I hope it wasn't nicked). it was a surreal and humbling experience and the best good bye present ever.

It's a tough job. you don't get any thanks. but the holidays are amazing....
you get it in the neck off everyone (and we're lazy). and we are teachers because we can't do anything else.

and I'm always driving the least flashy car when I meet up with my mates who are directors and senior managers in industry. I won't be retiring at 55.

But would I swap it for any other job or any amount of money? (within reason)

not a chance.

I've loved every single f***ing minute.

🙂
Thanks for that, can I copy it for my GCSE “how to stop people reading half way through” exam?
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 05:57 PM
elhombre
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by no fun
Thanks for that, can I copy it for my GCSE “how to stop people reading half way through” exam?
you're from wythenshawe - you'd still fail it, you couldn't pass wartoh.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 06:01 PM
TripDownMiseryLane
 
Default

Think/thought you only got the 'paid to train' if you had a !st class degree in maths or one of the other sciences, that was deffo the case at one time, otherwise standard student and pay your fees. Could be different now I don't know or take any notice.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 06:03 PM
elhombre
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TripDownMiseryLane View Post
Think/thought you only got the 'paid to train' if you had a !st class degree in maths or one of the other sciences, that was deffo the case at one time, otherwise standard student and pay your fees. Could be different now I don't know or take any notice.
which is what I've said - I think Quiggers is a maths grad

the degree class is irrelevant

If you're doing a maths and physics course you will get a very good bursary

they're throwing money at the trainees - it's also means tested, so if you're lucky/need it, you'll get even more.

it's so lucrative some graduates are doing it for the money for the year then leaving the profession.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 06:04 PM
suedeshoes
 
Default

My wife did teacher training when she was 35. She's an executive headteacher in a trust now. The money is great but she's always working. The hours are tough. Evening's and weekends taken over with planning and prep. She gets lots of holidays but spends most of them working to prepare for working. She prefered being a class teacher and will probably step down to do that again. She spent most of her time working then to. She's happy though.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 06:09 PM
no fun
 
Default

My mate was born with a squint in both eyes….it really hampered his learning but he buckled down in school and college and eventually qualified as a teacher

Only lasted a few weeks though….


….he couldn’t control his pupils
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 06:23 PM
TripDownMiseryLane
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elhombre View Post
which is what I've said - I think Quiggers is a maths grad

the degree class is irrelevant

If you're doing a maths and physics course you will get a very good bursary

they're throwing money at the trainees - it's also means tested, so if you're lucky/need it, you'll get even more.

it's so lucrative some graduates are doing it for the money for the year then leaving the profession.
Liked the pro's and cons

Always thought it was just 1st's. Tried to guide my lad into teaching after he'd finished his masters, £25k a year to train, work somewhere interesting, a bit like yourself 'a bit inner city not afraid' type, could teach, go anywhere, but he was having none of it.

He works in AI and sits around all day writing code which bores the hell out of him. Will share your post
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 06:38 PM
elhombre
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TripDownMiseryLane View Post
Liked the pro's and cons

Always thought it was just 1st's. Tried to guide my lad into teaching after he'd finished his masters, £25k a year to train, work somewhere interesting, a bit like yourself 'a bit inner city not afraid' type, could teach, go anywhere, but he was having none of it.

He works in AI and sits around all day writing code which bores the hell out of him. Will share your post
PM me if you need any more advice - I am a training mentor, so know a fair bit about it all...
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 07:04 PM
no fun
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elhombre View Post
PM me if you need any more advice - I am a training mentor, so know a fair bit about it all...
You a training mentor?

“Yes miss pemberton, getting your back doors kicked in by your tutor is absolutely essential for the Key stage 8 geography curriculum”
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 07:08 PM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elhombre
you'd be paid a wedge just to train to be a teacher - 25k just for a year to train to be a teacher. tax free lump sum. maths is in huge demand. as is physics.

did a PhD, MSc and BSc - cushy job in the NHS - medicine and clinical science.

every day seemed to drag and every day seemed the same.

felt like I'd done my stretch in that respect and done what I could.

I went in to teaching at 34(??)

I've had probably the most diverse teaching career possible - no fun knows where I taught and the role I had. basically a teacher who had the tough kids in a very tough area of Salford. that was my niche, my skill-set. teaching the hard to reach kids. I was Dr Teacher, but with a thick as f*** Salford accent.

I then went on to teach and still do teach in a very affluent area in a grammar school.

I also trained in a school with 55% traveller kids in Yorkshire.

my take on teaching

Cons:
* You've got to be mentally resilient - every day is just an unknown.
* with respect to the above, I've dealt with kids who have been stabbed, shot, their parents murdered. kids who have had psychotic episodes. I've dealt with kids under witness protection etc. i've had conversations with parents who are dying and parents who have lost kids. you see it all and you have to deal with it.
* I've worked in schools where kids don't have enough money for the electricity, they've got nits, they are stealing food from school.
* you've got to be able to deal with all this sort of stuff, whilst teaching pretty tricky stuff, like maths or physics but at the same time make the class fun. I can't count the number of times I've been hammered for my clothes, my accent, my anecdotes, my stories. every lesson I get shit for being smaller than some kids in year 9.
* With reference to the above, I've also lost count the times the kids have said "thanks sir, I've had a laugh - and we don't mean what we say.."
* you will work every night, marking, planning, going on sports trips in the pissing rain. you don't get a lunch time or a break as there's always something to do.
* the money is crap for the job you do and the hours you give up.
* you've always got someone telling you've got to do something extra and you never feel like you're winning


Pros:
* you may be the only decent adult or person that kid will meet that week - at the very least you'll be an adult who shows them a lot of constructive attention and who will be a significant part of their life.
* even by sometimes bollocking a kid (I rarely shout), you are doing them a favour by teaching them wrong from right and showing you care
* sometimes you may be the teacher who gets them the a-levels to get them to Oxford or Cambridge - that's happened to me this year.
* if you're having a shit day - and I've had a few of them, kids aren't your mates, but they'll never let you sit there and wallow. they'll always make sure you're alright even if they don't show it overtly.
* you change lives - I've taught some of the toughest kids you can imagine and even now, 10 years on in pubs in Salford and manchester, when they're with their crew they'll take time to come over and speak to you, because they know all you ever wanted was the best for them. if you show kids you care, they will never see you wrong. I remember this year, for my 41st, I kept telling the lads I taught that I really wanted a PS5, but couldn't find one as everywhere had sold out. they were leaving school soon (off to uni). the day before my birthday they gate crashed my lesson and presented me with a brand new PS5. (I hope it wasn't nicked). it was a surreal and humbling experience and the best good bye present ever.

It's a tough job. you don't get any thanks. but the holidays are amazing....
you get it in the neck off everyone (and we're lazy). and we are teachers because we can't do anything else.

and I'm always driving the least flashy car when I meet up with my mates who are directors and senior managers in industry. I won't be retiring at 55.

But would I swap it for any other job or any amount of money? (within reason)

not a chance.

I've loved every single f***ing minute.

🙂
That's a lot of cons! Although I should imagine resolving some of those issues is probably a pretty big pro.

Do schools routinely get told if a kid is in witness protection, or did you find out some other way? Seems a bit of a security risk that.

That PS5 was 100% nicked

You've got to be a certain type of person to be a good teacher, it is definitely not for everyone.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 07:17 PM
elhombre
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by red red robbo
That's a lot of cons! Although I should imagine resolving some of those issues is probably a pretty big pro.

Do schools routinely get told if a kid is in witness protection, or did you find out some other way? Seems a bit of a security risk that.

That PS5 was 100% nicked

You've got to be a certain type of person to be a good teacher, it is definitely not for everyone.
ways and means of knowing things

you get accustomed to knowing what's what and reading between the lines

the issue you have with teaching is that you have to be savvy and street wise. as well as fairly academic. it didn't used to be that way. but nowadays the amount of security/safe guarding training you get is pushing social work levels - especially at Designated Safeguarding Lead levels.

if you're a clown and don't engage brains in some cases you can end up in serious trouble.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 07:51 PM
Fat Al
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elhombre View Post
ways and means of knowing things

you get accustomed to knowing what's what and reading between the lines

the issue you have with teaching is that you have to be savvy and street wise. as well as fairly academic. it didn't used to be that way. but nowadays the amount of security/safe guarding training you get is pushing social work levels - especially at Designated Safeguarding Lead levels.

if you're a clown and don't engage brains in some cases you can end up in serious trouble.
My grandad did his teacher training in what was left of the East End of London just after WW2 (Millwall to be exact).
Taught the kids maths purely by using examples of darts & snooker scoring & racing bets.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 07:56 PM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elhombre View Post
ways and means of knowing things

you get accustomed to knowing what's what and reading between the lines

the issue you have with teaching is that you have to be savvy and street wise. as well as fairly academic. it didn't used to be that way. but nowadays the amount of security/safe guarding training you get is pushing social work levels - especially at Designated Safeguarding Lead levels.

if you're a clown and don't engage brains in some cases you can end up in serious trouble.
I was hoping that was the case

Teachers have become social workers as well as surrogate parents. You only need to see the fuss during covid about kids not being in school meaning parents couldn't work. These days too many people need two incomes to be able to afford to live and that means schools have become a babysitting service.

We've got practically zero unemployment but there are still tens if not hundreds of thousands of working people needing state help to get by, it's an absolute disgrace.

Sorry, off topic rant over
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 08:12 PM
elhombre
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Al View Post
My grandad did his teacher training in what was left of the East End of London just after WW2 (Millwall to be exact).
Taught the kids maths purely by using examples of darts & snooker scoring & racing bets.
heard that one a lot - if it works. it works.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 08:19 PM
Gypsum Fantastic
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TripDownMiseryLane View Post
Why don't you go consulting or apply directly to one of the tech colleges to teach what you do? There must be some demand up there, no?

Starting from fresh in teaching at your age is a big ask.....
It really isn’t . 50 isn’t old these days. As I said, friend of mine just done it and says it’s best thing he’s ever done. Similar age.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 08:22 PM
Sparky***
 
Default

Do it. Piece of piss. get about 20 weeks a year off.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 08:26 PM
elhombre
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsum Fantastic View Post
It really isn’t . 50 isn’t old these days. As I said, friend of mine just done it and says it’s best thing he’s ever done. Similar age.
50 is young and more significantly, you've got life experience

kids coming in at 21-25 to teach know nothing, which is even more apparent with this generation.

kids want someone who's been around the block - not someone who is young enough to be their brother or sister.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 08:31 PM
red red robbo
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky*** View Post
Do it. Piece of piss. get about 20 weeks a year off.
They do get a lot of holidays that's true, but not as many as you might think, there's a lot to do between terms. Also, you're stuck as to when you take your holiday, you can't just take a day off when you fancy it and there's no term time cheap holidays.
 
Unread 13-09-2022, 09:08 PM
browser
 
Default

Bursary info here: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...-academic-year
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